8 Mistakes To Avoid When Sending Bulk Emails

Bulk email is the most affordable and quick way to reach thousands recipients around the world. It seems easy to send bulk emails. But when you are very enthusiastic, you can do things that can get you in trouble with ISPs. Even a minor negligence can lead to your message being filtered as spam or junk mail. So, before you start sending your newsletters, check out this list of common mistakes that email marketers often make:

1. Not Asking for Permission

Permission is when each recipient on your list requested to receive newsletters from you. Before you choose bulk email newsletter software, take care about getting permission from your potential recipients. It’s easier than you think.

You’ve got a website. Put an opt-in form on your website or blog, or setup a standalone squeeze page and let people subscribe to your newsletters. As an incentive, give them a free PDF report, e-book, free download, discount to buy something from you in return for their email address.

It requires an extra time and efforts but you will be rewarded with better Inbox deliverability, less bounces and spam complaints, and most important with higher open rate and sales.

2. Buying or Harvesting Emails

Many email marketers used to buy millions email addresses and send them straight away without even verifying them for validity. One day they find themselves blocked by many ISP because their message generates many spam complaints and bounces. Their deliverability suffer, they lose subscribers and sales.

Never buy or harvest email addresses even if they are subscribed for someone else’s email newsletters. If those people didn’t ask for emails from YOU, and you are sending them, then you’re sending spam.

Building your own opt-in list takes time and patience. Don’t feel upset if you start with a few dozens subscribers only. In a week you will email to two times more. It’s like you are moving at a snail’s pace but finally you’ll beat in sales and profit those who are using blackhat email marketing techniques. Roadrunner webmail

3. Not Testing Email Newsletter

Email campaign preparation should not be your last minute affair because in a hurry you can do more harm than good. It’s important to remember that different email clients render HTML emails differently. If the email looks good in your preview panel, it does not mean it will look so for your recipients. That’s why you have to devote some time for testing your email design in different environments. To do this, set up accounts with free email services like AOL, Yahoo!, Hotmail and Gmail and send a test copy of your message to those accounts.

Then send a copy of your email to your friends and colleagues. They will open it in different email clients and on different operational systems. Ask them how your email is displayed.

If you encounter any crucial issues with the email design, hold on and take time to fix them. You value each subscriber and don’t want people to unsubscribe because they cannot read your email.

4. Making Them Forget You

Email marketing experts say that the subscription loses its actuality if you don’t email subscribers for 6 months. Sometimes email marketers setup a beautiful signup form or squeeze page but start emailing the subscribers a few months later after the subscription happen. Though they have the permission, their emails generate many spam complaints and bounces because the subscribers most likely forgot about their subscription.

So, if you have not emailed your list for a few months, think about re-engaging your subscribers and send them a short “remember me?” email reminding them about their subscription and providing them with the unsubscribe link.

5. Using Unknown or Personal Email Address in the “From” Field

Your personal free email address from @aol.com, @gmail.com or @yahoo.com domain is good for communication with your friends and for testing your email design. But do not use it to send email campaigns to your subscribers. “From” and “Subject” are two first things the recipient looks at. If you send from the email address which is unknown to your subscribers, they may not recognize the email is coming from you and delete it without reading. And using a free email address for marketing emails does not make a good impression about your company or yourself.

Use the email address from your website domain instead, for example “newsletter@yourdomain.com” or “subscription@yourdomain.com”, or your main email address from your website domain.

6. Forgetting about Unsubscribe Link

People change interests, preferences and it’s normal that they can unsusbcribe. So, before sending the email newsletter, you’ll want to make sure that your unsubscribe process works smoothly and that you included the unsubscribe link into your message. Ideally, you should also allow people update their profile with you because sometimes people may only want to receive your emails at a different email address.

7. Not Managing Unsubscribes, Spam Complaints and Bounces

What if you ignore them? It’s not only about email marketing etiquette but about your sender reputation too. Your ignorance will lead to worse deliverability of your future newsletters and serious troubles with your ISP or email service provider.

Though your list is opt-in, some emails may bounce. Take care about deleting invalid email addresses from your list. Remove the recipients who unsubscribed too.

Also, don’t forget about spam complaints. They are sent when someone on your list clicks “This is spam” button upon your email. Yes, an opt-in list can also generate spam complaints because people may forget about their subscription, or may not find the unsubscribe link in your email, or may not like your email content, or whatever. To be notified when your message generates a spam complaint, signup for freeback loops with major ISP.